Heidi Lynema, RD, Awarded National Board Certification

Heidi Lynema, a Registered Dietitian who resides in Hudsonville, MI, has been awarded National Board Certification by the American Association of Bariatric Counselors (AABC). After completing a specialized training and education program she was recently certified and credentialed as a Board Certified Bariatric Counselors (CBC).   Ms. Lynema serves as a dietitian with Intercare Community Health Network in Allendale and also Holland, MI. She also teaches nutrition through Spectrum Health Zeeland Community Hospital's community relation department and through Health Plan Advocate. She has received certificates in Adult, Childhood and Adolescence Weight Management from The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Her training in bariatric science with AABC will further her professional interest in providing best practices for the care and treatment of patients with all forms of obesities.  Ms. Lynema, who now has been a dietitian for almost 10 years, received her nutrition education at Western Michigan University and completed her RD/Dietetic Internship at Michigan State University.    BOARD CERTIFICATION AND CREDENTIALING STANDARDS   The American Association of Bariatric Counseling is an official US Federal not-for-profit, professional fellowship association dedicated to the advancement of bariatric science education and to the enhancement of obesity care and treatment. Founded in 2005, AABC is the world’s largest association exclusively representing professional multi-disciplinary bariatric counselors. Board Certification by AABC affirms that their credentialed fellows are licensed/registered/certified health or education professionals that have completed a specialized academic program in Bariatric Science and must continue their specialized education and training to maintain their Board Certification.

Heidi Lynema, RD, CBC

Heidi Lynema, a Registered Dietitian who resides in Hudsonville, MI, has been awarded National Board Certification by the American Association of Bariatric Counselors (AABC). After completing a specialized training and education program she was recently certified and credentialed as a Board Certified Bariatric Counselors (CBC).

Ms. Lynema serves as a dietitian with Intercare Community Health Network in Allendale and also Holland, MI. She also teaches nutrition through Spectrum Health Zeeland Community Hospital’s community relation department and through Health Plan Advocate.

She has received certificates in Adult, Childhood and Adolescence Weight Management from The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Her training in bariatric science with AABC will further her professional interest in providing best practices for the care and treatment of patients with all forms of obesities.

Ms. Lynema, who now has been a dietitian for almost 10 years, received her nutrition education at Western Michigan University and completed her RD/Dietetic Internship at Michigan State University.

 

 

BOARD CERTIFICATION AND CREDENTIALING STANDARDS
The American Association of Bariatric Counseling is an official US Federal not-for-profit, professional fellowship association dedicated to the advancement of bariatric science education and to the enhancement of obesity care and treatment. Founded in 2005, AABC is the world’s largest association exclusively representing professional multi-disciplinary bariatric counselors. Board Certification by AABC affirms that their credentialed fellows are licensed/registered/certified health or education professionals that have completed a specialized academic program in Bariatric Science and must continue their specialized education and training to maintain their Board Certification.

Dr. Shaimaa Alasfour, First Kuwaiti To Be Awarded Dual Board Certifications

Dr. Shaimaa Alasfour, CBC CBE

Dr. Shaimaa Alasfour, CBC CBE

Dr. Shaimaa Alasfour, a medical doctor from Kuwait, is the first Kuwaiti to be awarded dual Board Certification by the American Association of Bariatric Counselors (AABC). After completing a specialized training and education program in bariatric science she was recently credentialed as both a Board Certified Bariatric Counselor (CBC) and a Board Certified Bariatric Educator (CBE). Her unique qualifications in medicine and public health education provided the prerequisites for dual certifications.

Dr. Alasfour is a Consultant General Practitioner and VP of the Kuwait Lupus Group. Her professional memberships include, Kuwait Medical Association Society, World Organization of Family Doctors, International Bariatric Club, British Obesity Surgery Society, Royal College of General Practitioners, International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery and now a senior fellow of
The American Association of Bariatric Counselors and Educators.

She completed her medical training at Kuwait Institute for Medical Specialization in Kuwait City and became Certified in Family Medicine at Royal College in London. In addition, she has done specialized fellowships in obesity management in the bariatric unit at Saint Mary Hospital, Imperial College, London.
Dr. Alasfour’s training, experience, scholarship and commitment to public health will further the AABC mission of providing specialized bariatric science education and credentialing standards for the global health community.

BOARD CERTIFICATION AND CREDENTIALING STANDARDS
The American Association of Bariatric Counseling is an official US Federal not-for-profit, professional fellowship association dedicated to the advancement of bariatric science education and to the enhancement of obesity care and treatment. Founded in 2005, AABC is the world’s largest association exclusively representing professional multi-disciplinary bariatric counselors. Board Certification by AABC affirms that their credentialed fellows are licensed/registered/certified health or education professionals that have completed a specialized academic program in Bariatric Science and must continue their specialized education and training to maintain their Board Certification.

Emotional Impact of Words

 

Emotional Impact of Words

Words can have a very powerful emotional impact.  Words break hearts and it is harder to mend a broken heart than a broken bone. Many hurtful words that have found their way into our vocabularies are derived from the diet industry.

For best bariatric practicesLOSE THESE WORDS

FAILURE
If patients are given a prescription for a medication for high blood pressure, or diabetes and their pressure or glucose is not reduced, we would not use the words fail of failure for the patient, but rather the medication failed or was ineffective.
However when an obese patient is prescribed a diet or has weight loss surgery and their weight is not reduced they become the failure. We can be successful or unsuccessful in our endeavors to change… not failures
Failure has a sense of permanence and is “stuck” in the belief systems of many…we want to “unstuck it”.

CHEATING
Whether referring to infidelity, or cheating on an exam or taxes,cheating has profound moral and ethical connotations and is easily internalized. Cheaters are dishonest, deceptive or unfaithful. Certainly adults have the right to deviate from their diet plans. That is choice…. not cheating.

GOOD FOOD /BAD FOOD— AKA—HEALTHY/ UNHEALTHY FOOD
Food is not our moral compass and is neither good nor bad. All food contains nutrients and provides energy and cannot be labeled as healthy or unhealthy or good or bad. These words feed into the diet mentality and fuel the perfectionist, all or nothing forbidden food behaviors. Certainly some foods could be of advantage or disadvantage to specific medical conditions but this does not moralize them nor make them inherently good, bad, healthy or unhealthy.

FATTENING
All food contains nutrients and calories. Calories in excess of one’s individual needs results in the storage of adipose tissues….fat. Therefore, there are no specific foods that make you fat or can be considered fattening. All nutrition in excess of need results in weight gain…not any specific food choice.

We are part of the problem when we continue to label food with emotionally charged words like, fattening, good and bad, healthy or unhealthy. Then when patients deviate from diet plans we imply they are cheaters and failures.  Most of the patients we see have lived lives riddled with fat shaming. By continually using these words we provoke additional feelings of guilt and shame and then wonder why patients resist keeping honest food records for us to review.

Fat shaming (Fat Shaming in the Doctor’s Office Can Be Mentally and Physically Harmful) is as old as medicine and has never cured obesity. Best practices in genuine bariatric care requires sensitive awareness of the profound psychological burden associated with obesity, a burden that we can counteract by personally ridding ourselves of words that break hearts.

(APA)  Fat Shaming in the Doctor’s Office Can Be Mentally and Physically Harmful
http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2017/08/fat-shaming.aspx

Weighted Down by Stigma

In 1985 the US National Institutes of Health convened the first major conference on Obesity, The Health Implications of Obesity. Medical experts scientifically validated what MDs were anecdotally seeing in their practices, the relationship between obesity and the adverse effects on health and longevity.

Despite the experts being mostly MDs and having determined that obesity was associated with life threatening diseases like diabetes, CVD, certain cancers and even premature mortality, in their consensus statement they noted thatObesity creates an enormous psychological burden. In fact, in terms of suffering, this burden may be the greatest adverse effect of obesity.”

As early as 1985 they were wise enough to know that being weighted down by the stigma of obesity, the “psychological burden,” created greater human suffering than all the myriad of life threatening diseases associated with obesity.

Of Greek origin, Stigma refers to a marking or tattoo that was cut or burned into the skin of criminals, slaves, or traitors, to visibly identify them as blemished or morally polluted. These individuals were to be avoided or shunned. Obesity has become that stigma, the very visible marking that results in chronic psychological suffering.

That very stigma continues to riddle the lives of millions, in the workplace, in education, in health care, in romance and even within families. Being Weighted Down By Stigma, takes its toll with lifelong stress, and gets under the skin, worsening physical health and ironically exacerbates weight gain. (Weighted Down By Stigma.  (see full text below).

Prudent best practices in bariatric counseling recognize the dual diagnosis of obesity and mental illness and focuses on stigma reduction to achieve weight reduction.

Julie Rochefort – Shift the Focus

Weighted Down By Stigma (full text)

https://labs.psych.ucsb.edu/major/brenda/docs/Hunger%20et%20al.%20(2015).pdf

Does Obesity cause Diabetes, or does Diabetes cause Obesity?

Featured

Even those of us in the bariatric science community can become prejudice to the familiar and can and be blinded by the science of public consensus.

Perhaps it is because we often recognize overweight/ obesity prior to a diagnosis of type II diabetes that we leap to a cause and effect relationship and thus conclude that obesity causes diabetes?  Maybe we are wrong. What we know now about Type 2 Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome is that insulin resistance prevents glucose from entering our cells and results in elevated blood glucose. The elevated glucose is then converted in fatty acids and with the aid of insulin gets stored as fat in adipose tissue, resulting in obesity. Continue reading

Ida-Stiliana Gjinali Awarded National Board Certification

awarded National Board Certification by the American Association of Bariatric Counselors (AABC)

Ida-Stiliana Gjinali, MS, CBC

Ida-Stiliana Gjinali, MS, CBC, a resident of Bayside NY has been awarded National Board Certification by the American Association of Bariatric Counselors (AABC). After completing a specialized training and education program she was credentialed as a Board Certified Bariatric Counselor (CBC).

Ms. Gjinali completed her graduate education at Touro College in NYC and received a Master of Science Degree in Mental Health Counseling.  As a post-graduate at Touro she enhanced her education and received an Advanced Certificate in Bariatric Science.

Continue reading