Being Overweight or Obese Could Lead to a Longer Life?

Being Overweight: News from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (C.D.C.) has likely encouraged millions of Americans to rethink their New Yearís resolutions, dismount their treadmills, relax into their recliners and jog their minds with multi- media reports that being overweight or obese may actually lead to a longer life. It is also likely that many corporate leaders of our multi-billion dollar diet industry are now increasing their investments in requests for research proposals (R.F.P.s) to refute this news. And maybe, just maybe, this news could save our Twinkies.

Rethinking Obesity and Mortality for Adults

The study that attracted so much media attention was conducted by the C.D.C. and was a meta-analysis of a decade of empirical studies that included about three million adults from the U.S., Canada, China, Taiwan, Brazil, India and Mexico.

The study that attracted so much media attention was conducted by the C.D.C. and was a meta-analysis of a decade of empirical studies that included about three million adults from the U.S., Canada, China, Taiwan, Brazil, India and Mexico. This study revealed that adults that are slightly overweight (BMI 25-25.9) or mildly obese (BMI 30-34.9) have a 6% greater chance of outliving their thin ìhealthy weightî cohorts.

According to Dr Joseph Indelicato, Research Director for the American Association of Bariatric Counselors(www.aabc-certification.org), here is the “skinny” of an example of what a 6% chance of outliving their thin “healthy weight” cohorts could really mean:

About 1.3 people out of a thousand at age seventy, and .6 people out of a thousand at age sixty will live a bit longer by being overweight or slightly obese.Needless to say, the big news is that there is not a very significant difference in mortality risk rates between thin ìnormal weightedî adults and overweight or slightly obese adults.

Ironically, as early as 1987, ìRethinking Obesity: An Alternative View of its Health Implicationsî was published in the Journal of Obesity and Weight Regulation in which the authors came to the same conclusions that being overweight or slightly obese can lead to a longer life expectancy.

Read the complete study published in JAMA.

Watch the related educational video from the American Association of Bariatric Counselors.

For more information, contact stephen.phillips@aabc-certification.org

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